Events

Incorporating Diels-Alder Chemistry To Prepare Thermally-Responsive Polymers (Costanzo - Cal Poly)

Incorporating Diels-Alder Chemistry To Prepare Thermally-Responsive Polymers

Prof. Philip Costanzo
Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry
California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo

Abstract: 

Diels-Alder (DA) chemistry is becoming increasing popular due to its simplicity and efficiency. It also imparts a thermo-responsive aspect which can result in the preparation of responsive materials. The versatility of the DA chemistry allows it to be incorporated with a plethora of synthetic strategies for a range of potential applications. This work will describe the development of several different strategies of incorporation of DA chemistry within polymeric materials, including functional surfaces and prepolymers, initiators, inimers and crosslinkers, and post-polymerization modification. Potential applications range from dynamic surface treatments to rehealable coatings to rheological modifiers to processable matrix resins.

Speakers Background:

Prof. Costanzo graduated from Carnegie Mellon University in 2001 with a BS in Chemistry. As an undergraduate, he worked for Prof. Krzysztof Matyjaszewski for three years preparing materials via Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization. He then received his Ph.D. in organic chemistry with Timothy Patten at UC Davis, where he focused upon polymer and nanoparticle synthesis. He was awarded a National Research Council Postdoctoral fellowship at the Army Research Laboratory. As a postdoc, he worked in the weapons and materials division developing new materials for wide range of applications. He joined California Polytechnic State University in 2007 and is currently a Professor. His research focuses upon the development of structure-property relationships by exploiting simple and efficient methodology, such as Diels-Alder chemistry, to create dynamic and stimuli-responsive materials.

Date:

Wednesday, July 24, 2019

Location:

Michael’s at Shoreline
2960 N Shoreline Blvd
Mountain View, CA

Map

Timing:

6 PM social hour
7 PM dinner
8 PM lecture

Cost:

Employed/postdoc Student/unemployed/retired
Early Registration  $30 $15
Registration $35 $20
Walk-in (not guaranteed) $40 $25

Lecture-only is free.

 

Payment:

We accept cash or checks at the door, or online payment via credit card. No-shows are responsible for full payment of registration fee.

Registration:

Please register below or contact:

Albert Your

phone: 408-326-9650

Deadline for registration:

End of advanced registration: Tuesday, July 16, 11:59 PM

End of regular registration: Sunday, July 21, 5:00 PM

Dinner Selection:

Seafood - Blackened tilapia with mango salsa
Chicken - Breast of chicken with portobello
Vegetarian - Eggplant parmagiana

You should receive confirmation of your registration; if not, please contact us again.

Price: $0.00

Date: July 24, 2019

Address:
Michael's at Shoreline
Michael's Restaurant at Shoreline Park
Mountain View, CA
94043 Map and Directions

Available Spaces: Unlimited

Bio-Inspired Polymers and Systems to Solve Long-Standing Medical Problems (Prof. Venkatraman, NTU)

Bio-Inspired Polymers and Systems to Solve Long-Standing Medical Problems: Small Diameter Blood Vessels

Subbu Venkatraman
Professor, Materials Science & Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore
Director, Ocular Therapeutic Engineering Centre, NTU
Executive Director, NTU Institute for Health Technologies

Abstract: 

Biomimetics or biomimicry is the imitation of the models, systems, and elements of nature for the purpose of solving complex human problems.[1] . However, traditionally, research into biomimetic materials follows this paradigm:

Examples of such research include the classical mussel adhesion and lotus leaf super-hydrophobicity

In our group, we reverse the process, by defining the medical problem to be solved, and exploring bio-inspired solutions to the problem: the “solution” may be a material or design. One early example of this approach was carried out by Japanese researchers in 2011, on how a mosquito draws blood from humans, and adapted that approach to devising a “painless” injection needle.

A “mosquito-inspired” painless injection needle “Realistic imitation of mosquito's proboscis: Electrochemically etched sharp and jagged needles and their cooperative inserting motion”, H Izumi et al, Sensors & Actuators A, 115-123, 2011.

In our work, I will present an example of a small-diameter blood vessel that mimics the native artery mechanically. Small-diameter (diameter < 6 mm) blood vessels are needed for bypassing blocked arteries, in the heart or in the leg. However, when synthetic materials (such as PTFE, Teflon®) are used to construct these artificial blood vessels, the vessel gets blocked again within a year or two. This is due mainly to what is called “compliance mismatch” between PTFE and the native artery. We are using a design inspired by the human artery to match the dynamic mechanical behavior more closely, using materials that mimic elastin (low pressure response) and collagen (higher pressure response) properties.

We have explored the use of biodegradable polymers and copolymers to act as conduits that mechanically match the performance of the arterial wall. I will discuss the custom-built apparatus we used for measuring both static and dynamic compliances at physiological (blood) pressures, and report on the final materials choice based on the ideal mechanical property profile.

Speakers Background:

Professor Subbu Venkatraman has a PhD in Polymer Chemistry from Carnegie-Mellon University. He has spent about 15 years in biomedical R&D in the USA, working with various applications of polymeric biomaterials. He held a senior position in R&D at Alza Corporation prior to joining NTU as Associate Professor in 2000. Since then he has published extensively in the field of biomaterials, with a total of 240 publications, H-index of 41 and a citation count of 6500 He also holds 88 granted patents from a total of 171 applications. His work in biomaterials has led to 3 successful spin-off companies, with one of them (Amaranth Medical) obtaining substantial series C funding. He has also received the 2014 President's Technology Award together with Prof Freddy Boey and Adjunct A/P Tina Wong, for their innovative application of nanostructures and novel drug delivery approach to combat blindness from glaucoma. He is also the co-founder of Peregrine Ophthlamic Pte Ltd (http://www.peregrineophthalmic.com/) and Amaranth Medical Pte Ltd (http://www.amaranthmedical.com/).

His research group is interested in designing and modifying polymers for biomedical applications. In this work, they are closely associated with local hospitals and researchers, including the National Heart Centre, Tan Tock Seng Hospital and the National Cancer Centre. Current interests include the following:

• Nanomedicine
• Localized drug/gene delivery
• Biodegradable Stents and Occluders
• Injectable implants and nanoparticles
• Hemocompatibilization of polymers

Date:

Thursday, August 15, 2019

Location:

Michael’s at Shoreline
2960 N Shoreline Blvd
Mountain View, CA

Map

Timing:

6 PM social hour
7 PM dinner
8 PM lecture

Cost:

Employed/postdoc Student/unemployed/retired
Early Registration  $30 $15
Registration $35 $20
Walk-in (not guaranteed) $40 $25

Lecture-only is free.

 

Payment:

We accept cash or checks at the door, or online payment via credit card. No-shows are responsible for full payment of registration fee.

Registration:

Please register below or contact:

Jennifer Hoffman

phone: 650-390-9015

Deadline for registration:

End of advanced registration: Thursday, August 8, 11:59 PM

End of regular registration: Monday, August 12, 5:00 PM

Dinner Selection:

Seafood - Broiled Salmon with lemon beurre blanc
Chicken - Chicken with herbed butter
Vegetarian - Mushroom crepes

You should receive confirmation of your registration; if not, please contact us again.

Price: $0.00

Date: August 15, 2019

Address:
Michael's at Shoreline
Michael's Restaurant at Shoreline Park
Mountain View, CA
94043 Map and Directions

Available Spaces: Unlimited